People all around the world move looking for safety, security and a better life. All our stories contribute to the social fibers of our communities. Here you will find stories of struggle, triumph and uncertainty.

Mexican immigrants in Napa Valley went from migrant workers to California vineyard owners

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In March, the Newfoundland and Labrador government unveiled a new strategy to boost immigration, setting a target of 1,700 immigrants per year by 2022. Advanced Education, Skills and Labour Minister Gerry Byrne says the province's aging population means fewer people entering into the workforce over the long term. At the same time, he says, there are occupations and professions that are not being filled.

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‘When You’re Undocumented And Asian, You’re Invisible’ Tuesday, May 30, 2017 Stefanie De Leon Tzic / KQED Credit: Stefanie De Leon Tzic /KQED Above: Alvin poses in front of his car, a Nissan 240SX. in this undated photo. Aired 5/30/17 on KPBS News Alvin, a young Indonesian Dreamer, says being Asian and undocumented has been one of the most isolating experiences of his life.

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Waves of Asian, African and Latino newcomers have filled jobs at pork, egg and turkey plants where wages have fallen and work has grown more grueling.

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Marta Hernandez was startled from her sleep by government agents arriving at her family’s Irving house, ready to deport her back to her violent, dangerous homeland of El Salvador. But sixteen months later, the 34-year-old mother is on a pathway to U.S. citizenship. Her leap from desperation to hope illustrates how a determined lawyer scores a victory against rough odds. Hernandez was the subject of a front-page story in The Dallas Morning News.

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May. 6, 2017, 11:30 PM Edgard Garrido/Reuters Pensioner Pedro, 72, is seen at his house near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico. More than 100 days into Donald Trump’s presidency, his administration has yet to persuade Congress ( or Mexico ) to pay for an estimated $21.6 billion wall along the US-Mexico border.

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Superintendent Hanseul Kang recognizes college-bound students during D.C. College Signing Day on April 28. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post) The mother was serious as she approached the principal of her daughter’s D.C. school. Would the principal consider becoming her child’s legal guardian in the event she was deported, so her daughter, a U.S. citizen, could stay in the country? It was a surreal question but one rooted in real fear.

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Sold for Parts ProPublica 6 hrs ago Michael Grabell This story was co-published with The New Yorker. © Provided by ProPublica Osiel López Pérez, a Guatemalan immigrant, was just weeks past his 17th birthday —too young by law to work in a factory, when he lost his leg while working at Case Farmers. Leer en Español. By late afternoon, the smell from the Case Farms chicken plant in Canton, Ohio, is like a pungent fog, drifting over a highway lined with dollar stores and auto parts shops.

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© 2017 The President and Fellows of Harvard College Ask the undocumented 4 Harvard College students recount their journeys and their hopes May 4, 2017 | Editor's Pick By Liz Mineo, Harvard Staff Writer Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer W hen Jin Park ’18 was growing up in New York City, his family always told him to be mindful of his surroundings, to keep quiet about being undocumented, and to avoid busy streets where he might encounter immigration agents.

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Our house is bright orange, you can’t miss it,” says 69-year-old Juan Mejia as he paces up and down his driveway in Los Angeles County, wearing a salmon-colored polo shirt with khakis. He’s on the phone, giving directions to friends who will be joining him and his wife Carolina for a small, informal gathering to talk about the anti-immigrant climate in the United States — and what they can do to prepare for a worst-case scenario.

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From tropical detention, a Sudanese asylum-seeker bonds with an Australian journalist through WhatsApp By Carol Hills • 9 hours ago Related Program: Sudanese asylum-seeker Abdul Aziz Muhammed, who has been stuck in an Australian-funded immigration detention camp on a remote island in Papua New Guinea for nearly four years, is pictured here. His only hope is that the Obama-era agreement to resettle Michael Green UPDATE: This story was originally published on April 7.

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Change your edition back to menu DO NO HARM I’m learning how to be a doctor—with a conscience—in the shadow of Trump’s wall Written by Sandhira Wijayaratne Student, Harvard Medical School April 20, 2017 Take a deep breath. (Reuters/Jessica Rinaldi) Share Sandhira Wijayaratne Student, Harvard Medical School April 20, 2017 Every Wednesday, my medical school classmates and I swarm the wards and primary care clinics of nearby teaching hospitals, taking histories, fumbling through physicals, and slowly learning to practice the art of medicine. As I talk with a patient and run through my standard list ...

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Every week, a little league team in El Paso, Texas, practices late at night under piercing lights. In the distance looms a large, illuminated red "X," marking the Mexico side of the U.S.-Mexico border. The team is made up of 11-year-old boys, all of whom have grown up within a stone's throw of the border. They've grown up knowing this area of the U.S. — one that is currently a hotbed for political debate on immigration — as home.

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Syrian refugee families were shown the city’s sights, complete with Times Square characters and a carousel run by a man named Trump. A tour company is offering its services to the immigrants free.

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Last week I wrote about a woman carrying the fear of deportation around with her as if it were something to toss into her backpack next to her immigration paperwork. As she told an immigration attorney the story of how she fled Guatemala for the United States, she remained poised — until she talked about her children.

She wondered what would happen to them if she or her husband were detained and removed from the country.

Would her children be safe in America?

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Last week I wrote about a woman carrying the fear of deportation around with her as if it were something to toss into her backpack next to her immigration paperwork. As she told an immigration attorney the story of how she fled Guatemala for the United States, she remained poised — until she talked about her children.

She wondered what would happen to them if she or her husband were detained and removed from the country.

Would her children be safe in America?

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How some immigrant student activists are tapping the civil rights playbook This story is a part of Freedom University students and allies disrupted a Georgia Board of Regents meeting on Feb. 14, 2017, to protest two policies restricting access for undocumented students. Credit: Sasha Aslanian In the spring of his senior year in high school, Arturo Martinez’s friends began showing off their college acceptance letters. “Why are you not going to college?” he recalled them asking.

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I Have DACA, But That Didn’t Stop Trump’s Immigration Agents From Arresting Me Life in Mexico feels totally foreign to me—I’m from Portland. Francisco Rodriguez (Natalie Behring/ACLU) By Francisco Rodriguez | April 5 at 5:32 AM My earliest memory is of the day I first came to Portland. I was 5 years old, and my family had just arrived from Michoacan, Mexico. The city seemed enormous—it seemed like every time you turned the corner, it kept growing.

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How to shut down an immigration raid — even if it means getting arrested This story is a part of a- note taking civil disobedience.JPG An attendee of a training session in Las Cruces, New Mexico, takes notes about how to best protest immigration operations. 136 people attended the training, many of whom pledged to be arrested if needed to try to stop federal agents from deporting their neighbors.

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Sitting in a crowded office in lower Manhattan last week, Silvio Marcía was multitasking, mentally composing a sermon as he waited to get some legal advice. A lay preacher at Candelero del Oro in Brooklyn, he had chosen for his text an enigmatic passage from the Gospel of Matthew: Jesus, hungry and apparently annoyed, curses a fig tree without any fruit, causing it to wither as his astonished disciples watch.

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Reyna Ortega arrived to the United States in 1999 at the age of 14. She immediately began working on a conventional farm, where there was extensive use of chemical pesticides. “We don’t see a lot of justice for our environment,” says Reyna in this short film, Una Mala Hierba. “So at the same time, there is no justice for the farmworkers who are working the land.” Today, she works on a smaller, organic farm in Ventura County, California.

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These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image caption A rally for two young people detained by immigration officials in Vermont The Trump Administration's immigration enforcement priorities have revived deportation orders ignored during the Obama Administration. On Monday, Mr Trump criticized local law enforcement agencies for refusing to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice) to detain and deport people living in the US illegally.

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These are the faces of deportations under Trump USA TODAY 3 hrs ago Alan Gomez © AP Photo/Marco Ugarte Lucio Cervantes, a Mexican citizen who said he lived in the U.S. for 25 years, arrives to the airport after being deported to Mexico City, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Angel Ortiz Paz was warming up his car just before 6 a.m. outside his Gaithersburg, Md., townhouse on a recent morning when federal agents pulled in behind him.

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Fear of deportation has driven many undocumented immigrants further underground. Students have stopped showing up to class in districts around the country. Unauthorized people who are victims of crime have dropped their cases. Cities that are sensitive to immigrants’ concerns have canceled events.

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11:45 Stateside's conversation with brothers Javier and Juan. Young immigrants were filled with joy and hope when President Obama signed the executive order called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) almost five years ago. But today, those feelings of excitement have changed to ones of fear and apprehension.

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For six years now, Syrians have endured the loss and hardship caused by a protracted civil war. An estimated 4.9 million Syrians have fled their homeland, filling refugee camps in neighboring countries, and another six million remain displaced inside Syria’s borders. While Syrian government forces—backed by Russian air support—appear to have gained the upper hand in many places, recapturing the city of Aleppo in December, street battles and airstrikes continue to take place nearly every day.

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12:00 Stateside's conversation with brothers Javier and Juan. Javier: “My mom has been very worried. She’s just heard about all the raids in the different workplaces and even on Facebook sometimes people are posting like, ‘Be careful on this street, there’s ICE sightings.’" Credit Wikimedia Commons Young immigrants were filled with joy and hope when President Obama signed the executive order called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) almost five years ago.

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Shooting of Indian tech worker stuns India 01:15 But now, under attack because of their identity, Indians see the dream fading. Kuchibhotla was a young engineer from Hyderabad and came to the United States for a good job. He was having a beer with a friend near his home in Olathe when the shooter approached him, told him to "Get out of my country" and gunned him down. A few days later, another Indian man, Deep Rai, was shot outside his home in Kent, Washington.

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From ELLE I was speaking to my mom the other day when she said, "Maybe this place isn't safe for us anymore." We were pushing my baby in his stroller down a sunny sidewalk in Brooklyn, enjoying unseasonably warm weather. It was a street I loved before I lived in the neighborhood, with giant old trees and stately Victorian homes. The birds were chirping, confused by the February balminess, and I had no idea what she was talking about. "What do you mean?" I asked. "America," she said.

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PostEverything Perspective Perspective Interpretation of the news based on evidence, including data, as well as anticipating how events might unfold based on past events I’m a Dreamer. Immigration agents detained me anyway. For more than a month, I've been in a detention center. The inside track on Washington politics. Be the first to know about new stories from PowerPost. Sign up to follow, and we’ll e-mail you free updates as they’re published.

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Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence. An unaccompanied minor from Guatemala, in Hamilton, Ohio. AP Photo/John Minchillo The Trump administration has released a series of executive orders targeting immigration at the U.S. southern border. Central American families and children traveling alone represent nearly half of all unauthorized migrants apprehended by Customs and Border Protection.

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Sequoia Adult School Scholars (SASS) provides financial support, tutoring, and other assistance to adult students -- most working in minimum wage jobs -- so they can enroll in community college to continue their education, get jobs that pay family-sustaining wages, and serve as role models and advocates for their children.

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President Donald Trump has acknowledged that some undocumented immigrants are “good people” and said he has a “big heart” for some people who were brought to the country as young children. But as…

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But the forecasters were wrong in the most important respect. Workers continue to find work, but now the jobs are in service. Taking care of aging baby boomers, in particular, has become by far the largest driver of job growth in the American economy.

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Two weeks before finals in 2015, I learned my mother might be deported. The same thing had happened to my father three years before.

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The San Ysidro border crossing between San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Mexico, is the busiest in the western world, and up until the early 2000s it was surprisingly porous. For decades, Latin American families furtively crossed by the millions, determined to find a better life north of Mexico, and many of them did.

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Niran, a Muslim university professor living in Baghdad was scheduled to join her husband, Omar, in San Jose on Feb. 6th. Jewish Family Services of Silicon Valley resettled Omar in San Jose 4 years ago on a Special Immigrant Visa. Originally, Niran was scheduled to come to the United States in November, but she didn’t want to leave her students mid-semester. Now she is stuck in Baghdad – without her university job.

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Corina Rodriguez had her plan: finish high school, enroll in a four-year university, graduate with a bachelor’s degree, embark on a career in health care administration and start a family.

But life had other plans. Rodriguez became pregnant in her senior year at Pescadero High. A few months later, she was a new mother and a wife. Rather than enroll at a four-year university, she went to three different community colleges over the next three years. She did this while raising an infant and working full-time to pay her school, rent, food and gas.

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Ahmad Rafah, center, at his home campaign headquarters, on Friday, Oct. 28, 2016 in Santa Clara, Calif. Rafah is an Afghan refugee who is running for City Council in Santa Clara.

Ahmad Rafah, center, at his home campaign headquarters, on Friday, Oct. 28, 2016 in Santa Clara, Calif. Rafah is an Afghan refugee who is running for City Council in Santa Clara.

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