People all around the world move looking for safety, security and a better life. All our stories contribute to the social fibers of our communities. Here you will find stories of struggle, triumph and uncertainty.

DACA participant Flor Martinez was brought to the United States when she was a toddler and her sister just an infant. She has lived in this country nearly her entire life.

read more >>

PAJAI is just one of the hundreds of immigrant-owned businesses in St.Paul, Minnesota to get a boost from the city’s Neighborhood Development Center. NDC’s goal is to revitalize distressed communities. And it achieves that by empowering aspiring entrepreneurs. 

read more >>

"As Republicans, whose party has consistently and rightly advanced policies to support the essential role of families in America, we are deeply troubled by the harm that is about to be done to hundreds of thousands of families that have legally called America home for more than two decades."

read more >>

Our popular story of civil rights makes it seem as if most decent people were in favor of King and the movement. The reality was different.

read more >>

The story of Paul Simko was written by his great-great-granddaughter, Makenna DeGeronimo, a student at Palo Alto High School.

read more >>

Chahabi is a peer psychosocial counselor in Berlin, part of a growing effort to address the mental health needs of refugees in Germany.

read more >>

Many Americans will tell you that, while fresh off a cruise ship in Acapulco, or while strolling the beaches of Zihuatanejo, that Guerrero is a prosperous and safe region of Mexico. But for young Maria, raised in a home with dirt floors and no shoes of her own until she was a teenager, life in her coastal town was a struggle.

read more >>

When Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in August, Tosha Atibu and her husband Atibu Ty Ty were asleep in their home with their children. A neighbor woke them up to tell them the water was rushing up the street.

read more >>

The Butterfly Story Collective is a network of local storytelling projects produced by immigrants and about the immigrant experience in the United States. This podcast features stories shared by participants in those local projects from all over the country.


read more >>

Agreements with telecoms operators are helping South Sudanese families in the world's biggest refugee settlement connect with essential services.

read more >>

"My dad was 26, my mom was 30, my little brother was 5, and I was 6. We came from Lithuania, a country that had just gained its independence from the Soviet Union 9 years earlier. We were all so young and the American Dream was an old and romantic notion. But we initially faced only the repercussions..."

read more >>

Al Jazeera meets refugees concerned by the success of Germany's far-right party, which targets refugees and Muslims.

read more >>

Julio Salgado’s illustrations are powerful messages of survival and visibility.

read more >>

Nashville is a city that made a decision to embrace New Americans and invest in their community as a vibrant, international hub. The results are music to many people’s ears. 

read more >>

Watch this video to learn how Mariana—the director of strategic communications at the Miguel Contreras Foundation—and Gerardo Gómez—DreamSF Fellow at Pangea Legal Services—are fighting for their rights.

read more >>

"I was born in Nanning, China. I lived a simple life like others, as I lived with my parents and went to the only school in the village..."

read more >>

San Diego attorney Dulce Garcia has regularly defended clients in immigration court. Now, she is the one seeking legal relief.

read more >>

It’s the last day of Jori’s first week of kindergarten. Although her family arrived in the U.S. barely two years ago as refugees from Syria, the 5-year-old and her big brother, Majed, 8, are learning English and thriving in their new home in Dallas.

read more >>

"My uncle Tai was born and grew up in Cholon... Tai grew up during the war from 1962 to 1975. It was somewhat peaceful in Saigon (except for in 1968, when the Tet offensive happened where the North Vietnamese communist soldiers invaded Saigon for a short period of time)." 

 

read more >>

Since the creation of the Welcome Dayton Plan, Dayton has seen revitalized neighborhoods and business corridors, along with a significant increase in the number of immigrants settling in the city, which has helped to offset over 20 years of rapid population decline; now, local population and tax revenue decline has all but halted. 

read more >>

Martin Batalla Vidal, a DACA recipient, and Make the Road New York​ are headed to federal court challenging the Trump administration’s termination of the DACA program.

read more >>

Zaal had been a Nazi punk in his teens, but by his mid-twenties, he had become a fervent racist skinhead. A powerfully built man who sports a goatee and tattoos, is now 53. Two decades ago, he renounced organized hate groups and has since reinvented himself as a spokesperson for tolerance.

read more >>

The City of Neighbors, Philadelphia is a leader in attracting, retaining, and including immigrants, and has shown the positive economic and social impacts of being a welcoming city.

read more >>

Like so many so called “illegal immigrants” Alberto never wanted to leave his country. “I never thought I would leave, I wanted to be a soccer player, that is what I always wanted, I dreamed about it..." 

read more >>

Elizabeth was born in Cabugao, a rural town in the Philippines. She shares her immigration story as part of a project aimed to build bridges of interest, empathy and commonality among Silicon Valley residents.

read more >>

National Immigration Law Center shares stories of DACA recipients and those who support the program and want it to be protected and preserved. 

read more >>

Coding classes sponsored by Uniting NC give students from immigrant and refugee communities an opportunity to build apps to help give back to nonprofits and others.

read more >>

A New Yorker is preparing Muslim women to protect themselves against hate crimes.

read more >>

Jonathan Blitzer writes about his conversations with a longtime immigration-enforcement officer who is troubled by the agency’s hard line under Trump.

read more >>

Mexican immigrants in Napa Valley went from migrant workers to California vineyard owners

read more >>

In March, the Newfoundland and Labrador government unveiled a new strategy to boost immigration, setting a target of 1,700 immigrants per year by 2022. Advanced Education, Skills and Labour Minister Gerry Byrne says the province's aging population means fewer people entering into the workforce over the long term. At the same time, he says, there are occupations and professions that are not being filled.

read more >>

‘When You’re Undocumented And Asian, You’re Invisible’ Tuesday, May 30, 2017 Stefanie De Leon Tzic / KQED Credit: Stefanie De Leon Tzic /KQED Above: Alvin poses in front of his car, a Nissan 240SX. in this undated photo. Aired 5/30/17 on KPBS News Alvin, a young Indonesian Dreamer, says being Asian and undocumented has been one of the most isolating experiences of his life.

read more >>

Waves of Asian, African and Latino newcomers have filled jobs at pork, egg and turkey plants where wages have fallen and work has grown more grueling.

read more >>

Marta Hernandez was startled from her sleep by government agents arriving at her family’s Irving house, ready to deport her back to her violent, dangerous homeland of El Salvador. But sixteen months later, the 34-year-old mother is on a pathway to U.S. citizenship. Her leap from desperation to hope illustrates how a determined lawyer scores a victory against rough odds. Hernandez was the subject of a front-page story in The Dallas Morning News.

read more >>

May. 6, 2017, 11:30 PM Edgard Garrido/Reuters Pensioner Pedro, 72, is seen at his house near a section of the fence separating Mexico and the United States, on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico. More than 100 days into Donald Trump’s presidency, his administration has yet to persuade Congress ( or Mexico ) to pay for an estimated $21.6 billion wall along the US-Mexico border.

read more >>
 

Superintendent Hanseul Kang recognizes college-bound students during D.C. College Signing Day on April 28. (Photo by Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post) The mother was serious as she approached the principal of her daughter’s D.C. school. Would the principal consider becoming her child’s legal guardian in the event she was deported, so her daughter, a U.S. citizen, could stay in the country? It was a surreal question but one rooted in real fear.

read more >>

Sold for Parts ProPublica 6 hrs ago Michael Grabell This story was co-published with The New Yorker. © Provided by ProPublica Osiel López Pérez, a Guatemalan immigrant, was just weeks past his 17th birthday —too young by law to work in a factory, when he lost his leg while working at Case Farmers. Leer en Español. By late afternoon, the smell from the Case Farms chicken plant in Canton, Ohio, is like a pungent fog, drifting over a highway lined with dollar stores and auto parts shops.

read more >>

© 2017 The President and Fellows of Harvard College Ask the undocumented 4 Harvard College students recount their journeys and their hopes May 4, 2017 | Editor's Pick By Liz Mineo, Harvard Staff Writer Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer W hen Jin Park ’18 was growing up in New York City, his family always told him to be mindful of his surroundings, to keep quiet about being undocumented, and to avoid busy streets where he might encounter immigration agents.

read more >>

Our house is bright orange, you can’t miss it,” says 69-year-old Juan Mejia as he paces up and down his driveway in Los Angeles County, wearing a salmon-colored polo shirt with khakis. He’s on the phone, giving directions to friends who will be joining him and his wife Carolina for a small, informal gathering to talk about the anti-immigrant climate in the United States — and what they can do to prepare for a worst-case scenario.

read more >>

From tropical detention, a Sudanese asylum-seeker bonds with an Australian journalist through WhatsApp By Carol Hills • 9 hours ago Related Program: Sudanese asylum-seeker Abdul Aziz Muhammed, who has been stuck in an Australian-funded immigration detention camp on a remote island in Papua New Guinea for nearly four years, is pictured here. His only hope is that the Obama-era agreement to resettle Michael Green UPDATE: This story was originally published on April 7.

read more >>