The national debate on immigration is heated and has direct implications for policies and practices within the union. Content on this page highlight the experiences found in different states.

Public attention has moved, but the news hasn't: The separated families on the border are still waiting to be reunited.

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The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services is creating a new task force. Its goal: to examine what they say are bad naturalization cases, according to Director L. Francis Cissna’s June announcement.

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Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged

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President Donald Trump's immigration executive order attempts to solve one contentious action — the separation of families — but will bring back another — locking them up together indefinitely.

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A look at the private contractors, some of them ex-military, that have been awarded millions in federal contracts to run detention centers and build tent cities for migrants.

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Trump administration officials say they have no clear plan yet on how to reunite the thousands of children separated from their families at the border.

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President Donald Trump ramped up his attacks on the United States’ immigration system on Sunday, calling for those immigrants who illegally enter the country to be deported without judicial proceedings.

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The U.N. human rights office called on the Trump administration on Friday to “overhaul” its migration polices and find alternatives to detention, saying that children should never be held in custody, even with their parents.

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President Donald Trump this weekend lamented what he characterized as an invasion of illegal immigrants that is “very unfair to all of those people who have gone through the system legally and are waiting on line for year.  But illegal border crossings represent a relatively small share of the number of people who enter the country, legally or otherwise, in any given year, according to the Department of Homeland Security’s data.

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Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, cited the president of the American Association of Pediatrics, saying the practice is “government-sanctioned child abuse.”

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Immigrants fleeing domestic violence or gangs in their homeland are ineligible for asylum in the United States in virtually all cases, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Monday in a closely watched decision that reverses years of rulings by immigration courts and affects thousands of cases.

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Almost immediately after President Trump took office, his administration began weighing what for years had been regarded as the nuclear option in the effort to discourage immigrants from unlawfully entering the United States.

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Nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their families at the U.S. border over a six-week period during a crackdown on illegal entries, according to Department of Homeland Security figures obtained Friday.

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The White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump supported both Republican immigration bills being considered in the House of Representatives, offering a lifeline after the president suggested earlier that he opposed the more moderate bill. In an interview on Fox News Channel early on Friday, Trump appeared to blast one of two delicately crafted immigration proposals that had a better chance of passing.

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The Trump administration is finalizing a proposed rule that could have wide-reaching effects on legal immigration to the United States and the ability of immigrants legally present in the country to qualify for green cards or otherwise adjust their legal status.

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A small group of House Republicans emerged Friday from yet another closed-door meeting with the contours of an agreement for a GOP immigration bill that still left crucial policy details unresolved. The biggest hang-up remained what to do with people brought to the U.S. illegally as children, known as Dreamers.

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Census Bureau officials said asking about citizenship could be disruptive, but an immigration hard-liner connected to Steve Bannon pushed for its inclusion.

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The Trump administration’s transfer of hundreds of detained immigrants into five U.S. prisons puts the detainees and prison staffers at risk, said prison workers and immigration lawyers on Friday.

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Nearly 1,800 immigrant families were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border from October 2016 through February of this year, according to a senior government official, as President Donald Trump implemented stricter border enforcement policies.

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Immigration advocates accused the U.S. government of “effectively disappearing” hundreds of children in a complaint over the widespread separation of families crossing the southern border.

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A group of 21 immigrant rights advocacy organizations on Thursday filed a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration’s decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

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House Republicans are on the brink of an embarrassing showdown over immigration that Speaker Paul Ryan and his leadership team have been desperately trying to avoid.

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Senator Jeff Merkley posted a video showing he was denied entry to an immigrant detention center housing children who had been separated from their parents.

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The border fencing here, 15 feet tall and topped in some places by concertina wire, has made San Diego one of the most difficult places to cross for illegal migrants along the entire 2,000-mile boundary. Last year, U.S. agents made 26,086 arrests in the San Diego sector, down 96 percent from 1986, when they made 629,656.

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A panel of three appeals court judges in California on Tuesday asked the federal government to defend its decision to end a program protecting from deportation some immigrants who came to the United States illegally as children, who are often referred to as 'Dreamers.'

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The attorney general ordered judges to stop administratively closing cases, whether they think it's best or not.

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President Donald Trump is defending his use of the word "animals" to describe some immigrants who enter the country illegally, saying he would continue to use the term to refer to violent gang members despite a sharp rebuke from Democratic leaders.

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While it may be a time of great challenges for those who are immigrants, or work with immigrants, the executive director of the National Immigration Law Center, Marielena Hincapie, says the moment is critical for the United States. 

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White House chief of staff John Kelly said he believes the vast majority of undocumented immigrants crossing the southern border into the US do not assimilate well because they are poorly educated.

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With help from Ian Kullgren and Josh Gerstein DACA’S LEGAL LABYRINTH: The 9th Circuit will hear oral arguments Tuesday over President Donald Trump’s decision to end the DACA program, which offers work permits and deportation relief to undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children. 

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Federal judges have ordered the DACA program continued, but many recipients have been slow to reapply. The pace has picked up, but confusion over the law and fear of Trump policies has caused enough hesitation that some 9,000 have already lost their status and its protection from deportation.

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Immigration officials have sharply increased audits of companies to verify that their employees are authorized to work in the country, signaling the Trump administration’s crackdown on illegal immigration is reaching deeper into the workplace to create a “culture of compliance” among employers who rely on immigrant labor.

 

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Central Americans who travel north to plead for entry at the U.S. border are taking their chances on an immigration system that is deeply divided on whether they can qualify for asylum if they are fleeing domestic violence or street crime, rather than persecution from the government.

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After nearly two decades, the Trump administration is ending special immigration status for around 86,000 Hondurans who live in the U.S. - status granted following Hurricane Mitch in 1998. 

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When: 

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

11:00 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. ET 

Event will be also recorded.

Where:

MPI Conference Room 
1400 16th Street NW
Suite 300 (Third Floor)
Washington, DC 20036

 

Speakers: 

Randy Capps, Director of Research, U.S. Programs, MPI

Muzaffar Chishti, Director, MPI's office at NYU School of Law

J. Thomas Manger, Chief of Police, Montgomery County, Maryland, and President, Major Cities Chiefs Association

Gary Mead, former Executive Associate Director for Enforcement and Removal Operations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 

Rafael Laveaga, Head of Consulate of Mexico in Washington, DC (responsible for DC, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia) 
 

Moderator: 

Doris Meissner, Senior Fellow and Director, U.S. Immigration Policy Program, MPI  

Within days of the inauguration, the Trump administration announced sweeping changes that are reshaping the immigration enforcement system in the U.S. interior by which removable noncitizens are arrested, detained, and deported. 
 
In ways big and small, the administration is reorienting the enforcement system. At the same time, there is growing pushback, particularly from states and localities unwilling to cooperate with federal enforcement. How do arrests and deportations under the Trump administration compare to past administrations? How are state and local governments, civil society, and consulates responding? What are the impacts of new policies on federal enforcement, federal-state-local enforcement relationships, and immigrant communities? 
 
To assess the changes and their impacts, Migration Policy Institute researchers visited 15 jurisdictions across the United States, both those cooperating, such as Houston, and those limiting cooperation, such Los Angeles. Their findings are contained in a major new report MPI will release on May 8. It reflects interviews across a broad spectrum including ICE field leadership, senior local law enforcement and elected officials, immigration attorneys, community service providers, immigrant-rights advocates, consular officials, and former immigration judges. The report also provides analysis of national ICE data obtained via Freedom of Information Act requests. 
Join us for the release of this study and a discussion examining the operation of today’s interior enforcement system.   
This event will be recorded. 
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Art museums, a Gold Star father, lawmakers, states and one of Donald Trump's personal lawyers are pleading with the Supreme Court on the fate of the President's travel ban.

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The Trump administration said that the protected immigration status the United States granted to some 9,000 Nepalis after a 2015 earthquake would end in June 2019, making them vulnerable to deportation.

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Federal officials lost track of nearly 1,500 migrant children last year after a government agency placed the minors in the homes of adult sponsors in communities across the country, according to testimony before a Senate subcommittee Thursday.

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A federal judge in Brooklyn gave permission to the government on Monday to appeal his recent decision that allowed two lawsuits seeking to preserve a program that shields some undocumented young adults from deportation to cite President Trump’s “racially charged language” against Latinos.

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